Welcome to Clatsop County, Oregon Aux Comm

Providing Amateur Radio Emergency and Public Service Communications Throughout Clatsop County, Oregon

Announcements

New Local Area Net!

A CERT/MRC net will take place every Tuesday at 7:00pm on the Arch Cape repeater, 146.74


New EOC Frequency Matrix

Now available for members on Operations Documents page


Net Control Operators Needed!

Help with ARES NET on Monday evenings. It's an excellent opportunity to improve your radio skills.

Click here to contact Net Manager Robin KN0LL


Be Sure to Check the Activity Calendar for Upcoming Events!


ATTENTION AUX COMM VOLUNTEERS

Please remember to record your volunteer hours.



Published on Jul 7, 2012
 

At an FCC conference in May 2011, FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate mentioned that "When Everything Else Fails. Amateur Radio often times is our last line of defense." He said that we often rely on cell phones and public safety communication for their resilience, but we must remember that they fail--"They do, they have, they will!" Mr. Fugate went on to recommend that "A strong amateur radio community," "be plugged into" emergency communications plans. He emphasized that amateur radio should be included in emergency planning, because "When you need amateur radio, you really need them." In closing he included amateur radio communications as part of a broad mission which has one objective--to meet the needs of survivors of a disaster.

This video was filmed by the FCC and is in the Public Domain.

2017 National Preparedness Month Logo
The Ready Campaign recently released the September 2017 National Preparedness Month (NPM) theme and social media toolkit, which includes graphics, hashtags, and social media content to share.
 
This year’s theme is “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can.” In addition to the overarching theme for the month, each week has a theme highlighting different preparedness actions.
 
The NPM 2017 Weekly Themes are as follows:
  • Week 1:  September 1-9 - Make a Plan for Yourself, Family and Friends.
  • Week 2:  September 10-16 - Plan to Help Your Neighbor and Community.
  • Week 3:  September 17-23 - Practice and Build Out Your Plans.
  • Week 4:  September 24-30 - Get Involved! Be a Part of Something Larger.
 
For more information, visit www.ready.gov/september

tsunamiBy Katie Pyzyk | July 12, 2017 | Emergency Management

A tsunami striking the U.S. mainland might seem far-fetched, but scientists say preparation is crucial because it will happen — it’s just a matter of when.

An ocean wave pulls away from the shore and then, as expected, it moves toward land again. But it keeps moving farther and farther inland. The water pushes over unsuspecting beachgoers, backyards and entire cities with startling speed. It leaves a wake of destruction in Indonesia that includes an estimated 230,000 deaths.

Several years later, a similar scene unfolds in Japan when ocean water flows onto land to submerge cars, homes and even a nuclear power plant that never again will return to functionality. That time, the flood waters claim approximately 16,000 lives.

> Read more...

solar eclipseBy Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

Traffic, along with weather, will be the chief challenges for people wanting to see the total solar eclipse. I analyze how the US population is distributed with respect to the US road network and the path of total solar eclipse to predict how many people will visit the path of totality and the resulting traffic congestion. Using advanced ArcGIS.com software by Esri, US Census data, and a road network model of every street in the USA, I present estimates for where people will gather for the eclipse and in what numbers.

> Read more ...

ham radio

Agencies at the local and state level recognize the importance of the ham operators.

Yakima Herald-Republic, Wash. |  June 20, 2017

(TNS) - Police, fire and medical personnel immediately come to mind when the citizenry thinks of emergency responders, and for good reason. They are highly trained, highly skilled professionals who put their lives on the line in times of natural or human-caused disasters. For government agencies, an essential link consists of dispatch crews that garner information and quickly get the word out about trouble spots. That critical function gets a huge assist from a group of volunteers who perform a key role on the airwaves.

Radio operater

By Jade McDowell | February 17, 2017 | East Oregonian

The biggest natural disaster in the history of the United States, with the power to alter life forever in the Pacific Northwest, will start in Eastern Oregon with the rattling of windows.

That’s what the scientists say.

Rattling windows could mean Cascadia — the “big one” — an 8.0 to 9.0 magnitude subduction zone earthquake that seismologists at Oregon State University predict has about a one in three chance of hitting Oregon and Washington in the next 50 years. Research suggests such a quake has happened an average of every 243 years and the last one was more than 300 years ago.

It could happen 20 years from now. It could happen after we’re all dead. Or it could happen tomorrow.

If it happens tomorrow, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management predicts Umatilla County residents will likely notice some light shaking for four to six minutes, while some Morrow County homes might shake hard enough to knock over unsecured furniture. Next, the lights will probably go out. Then, cell phones, landlines, the internet and natural gas.

> Read more...